2018 - Jack LeDonne
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Congratulations to jack Ledonne, md

Winner of the 2018 Suzanne LaVere Herbst award for excellence in vascular access

The Association for Vascular (AVA) congratulates Dr. John (Jack) LeDonne, MD, on his selection as the 2018 recipient of the Suzanne LaVere Herbst Award for Excellence in Vascular Access. The Herbst Award is the highest honor bestowed by AVA, given annually to a member who exemplifies the AVA mission, is a recognized expert in vascular access, and who has made a significant contribution to the art and science of vascular access and/or affected outcomes for persons requiring vascular access.

Jack LeDonne characterizes the mission of AVA, and his influence has extended around the globe. Jack has more than 35 years of vascular access experience as a surgeon, hospital Director of Vascular Access, educator and mentor.

Jack has long been a proponent of ultrasound guidance as the gold standard for vascular access. As such, he has educated health care providers on the technology, clinical advantages and skill of ultrasound-guided vascular access. He has published on the subject, and lobbied professional organizations to support ultrasound guidance as the standard of care in vascular access. Jack is also a long-standing proponent of ECG guidance for determining central venous catheter tip termination.

Jack served on the AVA Board Of Directors as Director-at-Large, President-Elect, and as the 2011-2012 President.

Jack is a dynamic public speaker, and speaks at meetings and conferences domestically and internationally. He has performed hands-on vascular access training at host sites in the U.S., Russia, Turkey and Brazil.

In addition to his published work and public speaking, Jack has trained many clinicians who now practice safer vascular access because of his influence. He initiated and ran a hospital program to educate physician residents, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants on vascular access knowledge and skills. He also welcomed to his facility outside colleagues, both friends and strangers, to observe, discuss and learn. One admirer reported that her small team in a rural hospital frequently called Jack when they were developing their expertise. He always made time to answer their questions and assist with their clinical dilemmas. 

Jack is truly the quintessential educator; his work has created current and future mentors, and has positively affected vascular access for generations to come.